Brightcecilia Classical Music Forums

Go Back   Brightcecilia Classical Music Forums > The Classical Music Auditorium > Renaissance Music > Renaissance Music Listening Group

Notices

Missa l'homme armé

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 17-05-09, 04:26 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Missa l'homme armé

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

L'homme armé was a French secular song from the time of the Renaissance. It was the most popular tune used for musical settings of the Ordinary of the Mass: over 40 separate compositions entitled Missa L'homme armé survive from the period.

Notes, text and translation

Name:  800px-LhommeArme2.jpg
Views: 2100
Size:  20.2 KB

L'homme, l'homme, l'homme armé,
L'homme armé
L'homme armé doibt on doubter, doibt on doubter.
On a fait partout crier,
Que chascun se viengne armer
D'un haubregon de fer.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHNMgDIk1QI"]YouTube - L'Homme armé[/ame]

The man, the man, the armed man,
The armed man
The armed man should be feared, should be feared.
Everywhere it has been proclaimed
That each man shall arm himself
With a coat of iron mail.


Origin

The origins of the popularity of the song and the importance of the armed man are the subject of various theories. Some have suggested that the 'armed man' represents St Michael the Archangel (certainly the composer Johannes Regis (c.1425 – c.1496) seems to have intended that allusion in his Dum sacrum mysterium/Missa l'homme armé based upon the melody, which incorporates various additional trope texts and cantus firmus plainchants in honour of St Michael the Archangel), whilst others have suggested it merely represents the name of a popular tavern (Maison L'Homme Arme) near Dufay's rooms in Cambrai. It may also represent the arming for a new crusade against the Turks. There is ample evidence to indicate that it held special significance for the Order of the Golden Fleece. It is useful to note that the first appearance of the song was exactly contemporaneous with the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks (1453), an event which had a huge psychological effect in Europe; composers such as Guillaume Dufay composed laments for the occasion. Yet another possibility is that all three theories are true, given the feeling of urgency in organizing a military opposition to the recently victorious Ottomans which permeated central and northern Europe at the time.
Another recently proposed theory for the origin of the tune is that it is a stylised combination of a street cry and a trumpet call, and may have originated as early as the late 14th century, or perhaps early 15th, due to its use of the major prolation, which was the commonest metre at the time.


Use in the Latin Mass

L'homme armé is especially well remembered today because it was so widely used by Renaissance composers as a cantus firmus for the Latin Mass. It was probably used for this purpose more than any other secular song: over 40 settings are known. Many composers of the Renaissance set at least one mass on this melody; the two settings by Josquin, the Missa L'homme armé super voces musicales, and the Missa L'homme armé sexti toni are among the best known. Other composers who wrote more than one setting include Pierre de La Rue, Cristóbal Morales, and Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. A cycle of six settings, all anonymous but probably by the same composer, survives in a Neapolitan manuscript which was supposedly a gift to Beatrice of Aragon of some of the favorite music of Charles the Bold.
While the practice of writing masses on the tune lasted into the seventeenth century, including a late setting by Carissimi, the majority of mass settings of "L'homme armé", approximately 30, are from the period between 1450 and 1510.
One of the earliest datable uses of the melody itself was in the combinative chanson Il sera pour vous conbatu/L'homme armé ascribed to Robert Morton, which now is believed to probably date from around 1463, due to historical references in the text. Another possibly earlier version of the tune is an anonymous three-voice setting from the Mellon Chansonnier, which also cannot be precisely dated. In 1523 Pietro Aron, in his treatise Thoscanello suggested that Antoine Busnois was the composer of the tune; while tantalizing, since the tune is stylistically consistent with Busnois, there is no other source to corroborate Aron, and he was writing approximately 70 years after the first appearance of the melody. Richard Taruskin has argued that Busnois wrote the earliest known mass on the melody, but this is disputed, many scholars preferring to see the older Guillaume Dufay as the creator of the first L'homme armé Mass.[citation needed] Other composers whose settings of the tune may date from the 1450s include Guillaume Faugues, Johannes Regis, and Johannes Ockeghem.
The tune is singularly well-adapted to contrapuntal treatment. The phrases are clearly delineated, and there are several obvious ways to construct canons. It is also unusually easy to recognize within a contrapuntal texture.


Modern treatments

Composers still occasionally turn to this song for spiritual or thematic inspiration. In 1968 the British composer Peter Maxwell Davies wrote his Missa super l'homme armé. American composer Mark Alburger includes settings of L'homme armé in his Deploration Passacaglias (1992) in the first (Ockeghem) and tenth (Bach) movements. The Welsh composer Karl Jenkins continues a 600-year tradition with The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace, written in 1999 to a commission from the Royal Armouries to mark the millennium. Christopher Marshall wrote L'homme armé: Variations for Wind Ensemble in 2003.

Last edited by micrologus; 17-05-09 at 04:49 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 17-05-09, 04:48 PM
Herzeleide's Avatar
Herzeleide Herzeleide is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,904
Rep Power: 44
Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of Herzeleide has much to be proud of
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by micrologus View Post
Richard Taruskin has argued that Busnois wrote the earliest known mass on the melody, but this is disputed, many scholars preferring to see the older Guillaume Dufay as the creator of the first L'homme armé Mass.
One can follow the big spat about this on JSTOR (as well as Taruskin, it involves people like Reinhard Strohm and David Fallows). Taruskin won out in the end (of course ).

Does anyone know Palestrina's two masses on this tune? I did a presentation on one of them a few years' back.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 17-05-09, 05:02 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default

I'm waiting for my Palestrina mass on the theme
I can only find one of the two, but on the other hand I have the two by Josquin
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 17-05-09, 05:58 PM
fivelive's Avatar
fivelive fivelive is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: North Essex UK
Posts: 146
Rep Power: 7
fivelive will become famous soon enough
Default

Hi Micrologus! I've arrived.
Thanks for your info about L'homme armé. It's good to know the origins of the tune which appears in 'The Armed Man'
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 17-05-09, 06:34 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default

You're wellcome, Fivelive
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 25-07-09, 02:19 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Antoine Busnois ( c.1430 - 1492 )

Busnois’s Missa l’Homme Armé is one of the most revered works of the later fifteenth century. Dufay, Basiron and Faugues all apparently wrote from it in their own Masses based on the tune, and two composers - Obrecht, in his Missa l’Homme Armé, and the anonymous composer of a Missa de Sancto Johanne Baptista - even adopt the entire rhythmic organization of Busnois’s setting of the melody as the structual underpinning of their own Masses. Its status is confirmed by its survival today in no fewer than seven manuscripts, an unequalled number for the time of its composition (probably the 1460’s); and whether or not, as some have claimed, it was the earliest Mass composed on the famous tune, there is no question but that Busnois’s was the most influential and authoritative of the series, a conclusion reinforced by the suggestion of two laterntheorists that he may even have composed the model song.

The popularity of the l’Homme Armé Mass seems to have been very much of a piece with its composer’s reputation among his contemporaries more generally: Johannes Tinctoris, the greatest music theorist of the day, dedicated one of his treatises jointly to Busnois and Ockeghem, and elsewhere praises Busnois as among the finest composers whose music he has heard. His literary reputation is affirmed by Tinctoris’s extolling of his skill in Latin, and by the composition by the great poet Jean Molinet of a poem dedicated to him, a compliment the composer returned. This Mass is far from the only work by Busnois to have spawned emulations: a plethora of songs and Masses of the period use his songs as models.

Busnois’s Missa l’Homme Armé is beyond doubt one of the most mesmerizing and exhilarating pieces of the fifteenth century. Legendary for the virtuoso idiom of his sacred works, Busnois is nowhere more pyrotechnic than here: it would have been fascinating to hear how the original singers of this work - its composer most likely included - would have approached such gestures as the famous bass surge through a tenth up to top F in the second part of the Gloria, and their even more challenging (at least to modern voices) climb up to top G in the previous section. This is music that not only bespeaks confidence: it demands it, in ample measure, from its performers.

But there is much more here than just gymnastics: Busnois has (to modern sensibilities anyway) an uncanny sence of timing, with everything seeming to fall fecitously, suavely sculpted components building into a masterly overall design. Thus points of repose are just as absorbing as points of tension, the brilliant pacing and manipulation of rhythm, pitch and counterpoint seeming to draw the listener irresistibly onward. Everything seems calculated to entice the ear into Busnois’s often subtle and nuanced soundworld, and to listen intently to the gracefully arching and gently climaxing melodic lines in such reduced-voice passages as the ‘Christe’ section of the Kyrie is to recieve an impression of real feeling and sincerity of utterance.


Andrew Kirkman


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uADnDR2TAeY"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 1. Kyrie[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zntX1k7bCAA"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 2. Gloria[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7dT6RU9Fc4"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0T8sV8u9kNA"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 4. Sanctus[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O1l63FKsMo"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 5. Benedictus[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ge18mUqpK_o"]YouTube - Antoine Busnois: Missa l'Homme Armé 6. Agnus Dei[/ame]
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 25-07-09, 02:22 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Johannes Ockeghem ( c. 1420 - 1497 )

The courtly milieu of the "waning Middle Ages" gave a warm reception to the first "L'homme armé" tune. This jaunty little fifteenth-century ditty, about an armed knight riding to conquest, may have gained popularity in the 1460s, when a new Crusade against the Turk was being preached. Antoine Busnois and Robert Morton, composers to Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, involved themselves with the tune, and by the end of the decade, a tradition had been spawned of composing cyclic Masses based upon the hit song; around forty "L'homme armé" Masses would be composed in the later fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, many as showpieces of one-upmanship between composers. Among the earliest contributions to this huge complex of musical cross-references, and probably one of the earliest of the composer's masses, is the Missa l'Homme armé of Johannes Ockeghem.

The earliest composers to complete cycles of all five movements of the Mass Ordinary, unified around a voice (usually the tenor) singing "L'homme armé" as cantus firmus, include Busnois, Ockeghem, and Guillaume Dufay. (A splendid collection of six masses on the tune from this early period also survives, having apparently been a gift presented by Charles' Burgundian court to the King of Naples.) It has proven difficult for scholars to determine which of the three was written first. Busnois' patron was Charles the Bold himself, and the other two masses could have been written for his court, or for his noble Order of the Golden Fleece (1468), in imitation of Busnois. Another possible occasion hypothesized for Ockeghem's version is a French celebration in 1454 of the end of the Hundred Years' War, at which Ockeghem was present. With Ockeghem's early penchant (demonstrated in his Missa Caput) for challenging himself compositionally by adapting (and complicating) the plan of another man's piece, he could hardly have known of the complexity of Dufay's and Busnois' settings and let the opportunity to exceed them pass.

Ockeghem's treatment of his cantus firmus is remarkably lucid in some senses, though compositional advances in his style are very much in evidence. The memorable tune, with its characteristic and quite audible leaps of martial fifths and fourths, is sung in its entirety at least once in each movement; he manipulates the rhythmic content by careful placement of rests, but does not change the basic contour. He attempts no inversion of the tune (as in Busnois' Agnus Dei) or retrograde (as in Dufay's Agnus). However, he does call for transposition twice--down a fifth in the Credo, placing the cantus firmus melody below the other voices, and down an octave in the Agnus Dei, creating a sudden new richness of vocal depth for the final movement. While Josquin later chose to culminate his Missa l'Homme armé super voces musicales with climactic transposition upwards, Ockeghem -- known as a splendid bass singer -- naturally seeks depth. He also creates a setting which takes advantage of certain ambiguities within the system of modal music, such that intentional variations between B flat and B natural in the tenor melody create different harmonic casts for different movements. Finally, his Agnus Dei III beautifully manipulates the vocal scoring -- first alternating a series of duets, then trios, and concluding with the full four-voiced texture -- to culminate his entire mass.



[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68N791msDt0"]YouTube - Johannes Ockeghem: Missa l'Homme Armé 1. Kyrie[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8a80hjEJqo"]YouTube - Johannes Ockeghem: Missa l'Homme Armé 2. Gloria[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38WUoZ2eExc"]YouTube - Johannes Ockeghem: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-OCPAG7WBo"]YouTube - Johannes Ockeghem: Missa l'Homme Armé 4. Sanctus[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GmhOS9iBy0"]YouTube - Johannes Odkeghem: Missa l'Homme Armé 5. Agnus Dei[/ame]
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 25-07-09, 02:33 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Guillaume Dufay ( c. 1400 - 1474 )

L'Homme Arme was a monophonic melody with political and satirical strains. Dufay made one of the first versions of it in a polyphonic setting in his Missa L’Homme Arme. The beginning of the cycle is designed so that, in the absence of instrumental accompaniment, the cantus firmus is virtually indistinguishable until near the end of the Gloria. The tenor sings the cantus firmus, overlapped by the bass line and other voices that conceal the melody of L'Homme Arme. If this were played by instrumentalists, rather than vocalists, the tone quality of the varying instruments would serve to open up all the parts to the ear, thus illuminating the cantus firmus as well. This hidden quality of Missa L’Homme Arme suggests the playfulness of Dufay with his compositions.
Dufay was almost certainly in his sixties when he wrote his Missa l’Homme Armé.



[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLwMEBlBBB4"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé 1. Kyrie[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drqXpKuxuxc"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé 2. Gloria[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6UHuIjUaeZc"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo (1/2)[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n87rb7rFBl8"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo (2/2)[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGc6dTvbxMc"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé 4. Sanctus (1/2)[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbcojJ6kojU"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé Sanctus 2 2[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWyGfK4k2bs"]YouTube - Guillaume Dufay: Missa l'Homme Armé Agnus Dei[/ame]
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 25-07-09, 03:12 PM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Johannes Tinctoris ( c. 1430 - c. 1511 )

Johannes Tinctoris gave Brain l'Alleud as his birthplace when he registered at the German Nation of Orleans University, which he entered on April 1, 1463. The name he used may have been a Latinized version of his actual vernacular name. His putative hometown is located 20 miles from Brussels, so he might have had a Dutch, French, Flemish, or German name, be it Tinctor, Teinturier, de Vaerwere, or Färbers, all of which have been used in writings about him. It is equivalent to the English Dyer, meaning a person who dyes things. All the original sources use Tinctoris.

By the time he entered that university, he had already been a director of choir boys and was listed elsewhere in the register as a "venerabilis dominus magister." Around 1472, he entered the service of the King of Naples, Ferdinand I, and served as tutor to his daughter, Princess Beatrice. In his own writings, Tinctoris referred to himself in various ways, including "magister" and "cappellanus," implying that he eventually had a major, perhaps the top, supervisory position among the musicians. This is supported by the fact that in 1487, Ferdinand instructed him to take charge of recruiting singers from the establishments of other kings. There is some slight hint that he may have been in Rome and performed for the Pope, though the time and place of his death are unknown. The date above is inferred by musicologists from the fact that on October 12, 1511, one of his positions was transferred to another musician. Tinctoris is valued especially highly by musicologists as a theorist, the author of several treatises on music. These are exceptionally valuable for their systematic and clear explanation of much that was going on in music at the time. The most revered is Terminorum musicae diffinitorium, a listing of 299 definitions of current musical terms. In short, it is the first printed music dictionary. Four of his tracts discuss the mensural notation in use at the time. Another, Tractatus de notis et pausis explains the notes and their time values. Another work, of 51 chapters, exhaustively discusses the system of church modes. There is a book on lute playing and an exceptionally valuable book in three volumes on counterpoint. In addition, Complexus effectum musices is a philosophical work thoroughly discussing the poetics of the art, its esthetics value, its role in religion, its part in education and the treatment of illnesses, and its traditional powers.

Most of these works are profusely illustrated with musical examples and citations to authorities from Plato and Aristotle to composers of Tinctoris' own time. A substantial number of examples are not attributed to anyone and it is clear that they were written by Tinctoris himself. In addition, Tinctoris published music outside the treatises, which he did sign, including sacred and secular vocal music characterized by gracefully flowing, though complex, polyphony. He was among the many composer who wrote a mass with the popular song L'homme armé as its cantus firmus; this is the Missa Cunctorum plasmator summus. During his time, he was extolled both as one of the most notable musicians of the time and as a great writer about music.

Tinctoris’s Missa l’Homme Armé is not free from peculiarities. If it fits well into the famous tradition of masses on a cantus firmus, it twice has recourse (in the Kyrie and the Sanctus) to tropes. This feature explains the title sometimes given to this Mass: Missa Cunctorum Plasmator Summus.
In the Kyrie, the nine “proses” of the trope are distributed equally between the three sections (three in the Kyrie, three in the Christe, three in the Kyrie 2). The text “Cunctorum plasmator summus” is not otherwise known, and probably has no liturgical function. The tropes in the Sanctus reveal themselves to be a paraphrase of Isaiah VI, 3, while those of the Osanna draw on several New Testament sources, and those of the Benedictus are original. The unique character of these tropes lends credence to the supposition that they were written by Tinctoris himself, according well with the mastery of Latin he amply demonstrates in his theoretical writings.


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwbnG2XD540"]YouTube - Johannes Tinctoris: Missa l'Homme Armé 1. Kyrie[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrJa6WudpXM"]YouTube - Johannes Tinctoris: Missa l'Homme Armé 2. Gloria[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=truG90URxgA"]YouTube - Johannes Tinctoris: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHe4dQCRpU0"]YouTube - Johannes Tinctoris: Missa l'Homme Armé 4. Sanctus[/ame]


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSD2GpZc-pA"]YouTube - Johannes Tinctoris:Missa l'Homme Armé 5. Agnus Dei[/ame]
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 15-09-09, 08:15 AM
micrologus's Avatar
micrologus micrologus is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Flanders (Belgium)
Posts: 2,472
Rep Power: 43
micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of micrologus has much to be proud of
Default Pierre de la Rue ( c. 1460 - 1518 )

Pierre de la Rue’s Missa l’Homme Armé is an illustrationof Conrad of Zabern’s essential tule of composition: ‘differentialiter cantare’. Here de la Rue subscribes to the great comporative tradition of polyphonists in choosing as subject the famous tune of ‘L’Homme Armé’, a chanson that made its appearance in the 15th century in the Burgundian cultural sphere - it may have been written vy Antoine Busnois... -, most probably under the impulse of the new orders of chivalry that re-awakened the spirit of the Crusades just afterthe fall of Constantinople (1454). The fact remains that this chanson, which quickly became popular, soon asserted itself, on account of its contrapunctal potential, as a kind of obbligato passage in the proof of polyphonic mastery. Pierre de la Rue, like Josquin Des Prez, wrote two Masses on it.

In the first of these the technique of the contus firmus breaks out into a polyphonic paraphrase by means of the almost constant play on canons. The polyphonist abandonshimself to a veritable exhibition of contrapuntal virtuosity, submitting his subject to a multitude of rhythmic manipulations: the canonic writting derives from the combination and the superimposition of tempi determined by different ‘mensurations’. This virtuolity culminates in the last Agnus in a ‘fuga quatuor vocum ew unica’, which theorists were to cite as an example throughout the 16th century, from Heyden (1537) and Glereanus (1547) to Paix (1594). The four voices simultaneoulsy sing the same melodic line, subjeting in to different mensurations (tempus perfectum, imperfectum, emperfectum diminutum and proportio tripla).
In this extravagant technical virtuosity the last but still dazzling flaring up of the flamboyant gothic manifests itself.


Jean-Pierre Ouvrard

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIyKW83oA2c"]YouTube - Pierre de la Rue: Missa l'Homme Armé 1. Kyrie[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEBPAuOs_tg"]YouTube - Pierre de la Rue: Missa l'Homme Armé 2. Gloria[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Za4Aj5RQY5Q"]YouTube - Pierre de la Rue: Missa l'Homme Armé 3. Credo[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkOsUcKt_do"]YouTube - Pierre de la Rue: Missa l'Homme Armé 4. Sanctus[/ame]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NW4vp84YLok"]YouTube - Pierre de la Rue: Missa l'Homme Armé 5. Agnus Dei[/ame]
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Missa Tournai micrologus Medieval Music 6 26-02-09 09:44 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
brightcecilia.com © copyright 2008 All Rights Reserved.

about Brightcecilia - brahms listening group - contact site admin - faq - features - forum rules - gallery - getting started - invite - links - lost password? - mahler listening group - pictures & albums - privacy - register - schubert listening group - search - self-promotion - today's posts - sitemap - the Zelenka Obsession - website by havenessence